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PostPosted: Tue Jan 06, 2004 12:26 pm 
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Joined: Mon Dec 29, 2003 16:54 pm
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Location: Haversham Milton Keynes
Real Name: Matt Nott
Group: FAAA
Hi Guys,

Recently purchased a carbine and wood work is well worn in.
What's the best way of improving the colour as mine is very dark and stained?

Cheers

Matt


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 06, 2004 12:32 pm 
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Location: Fulham, London
Real Name: Chris
Group: The Stonewallers (29th Infantry Division, C Co.)
I'm not 100% on this but I think that boiled linseed oil does the trick and makes it look very nice.


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 06, 2004 13:08 pm 
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Joined: Mon Dec 29, 2003 14:47 pm
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Hi Guys
Chris your right linseed oil is the way to go, i have cleaned up two carbines and three thomsons using it. if its really grubby (going Black) strip weapon down to the wood get some fine wire wool and clean woodwork down slowly and gently using cold water keep it wet while using the wool. let it dry and apply several thin coats of linseed oil until you get the colour you want.

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 06, 2004 13:41 pm 
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I boiled the crap out of mine. :D

Stuck it in the sink ( brown enamel, so it didn't stain it ), then kept pooring boiling water into it until it was full. Went and watched telly. Every half hour I went and turned it the other way up ( can't get a whole carbine stock in my sink :( ) and topped up the hot water. After about four hours, I took it out, rinsed the scum off with the aid of more hot water and wire wool, and left it to dry slowly ( quickly will crack it ). Next day it was almost white. I then redyed it and the next day treated it well with Linseed oil. It was good as new and the heat makes the air in the dings expand and forces them out, so it does two jobs at once. Another trick for ding removal or minimalisation is to go over it with a hot steam iron with loads of extra steam. Believe me, it works, try it sometime.

Since I got an M1A1 stock for my carbine, I flogged the other on eBay for £65. That's how good it looked 8)

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 06, 2004 13:54 pm 
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Just to clarify, I didn't do the above on a whim. I actually found the technique on a Carbine website, whilst searching for a new stock. The guy who wrote the article restores woodwork for a living, particularly Carbines. The only thing he does differently, is that he puts his in the bath, but, as mine is champagne colored plastic and I wanted to stay married, I used the sink instead. He has all the correct cartouches to stamp into his refurbs too :shock:

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 06, 2004 18:07 pm 
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No probs P, there's no rush.

BTW, that boiling method didn't make mine brittle at all. After numerous coats of oil it was as strong as ever. The guy who recommended it restores Carbine, Springfield and Garand stocks ( among others ) for a living, and says he hasn't had one crack or break yet. Apparently, the problems come if you let it dry to quickly, i.e. don't put it on a radiator :D

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 06, 2004 19:32 pm 
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Just spent the best part of half a day looking for it P. It was there on tinternet. As I said, I was looking to buy a new or refurbished stock at the time. Saw the article, thought "bugger it, I'll give it a go", had nothing to lose because it was always my intention to fit the M1A1 stock my Carbine anyway, but fancied the standard stock as a spare or alternative. It was full of grime, grease, cosmolene and dings before I did it. Really nasty. The soaking process worked perfectly. He did say that if the wood dried too quickly and unevenly that it could crack, but slowly and evenly would have no effect once oiled. He was right. I think it was a walnut stock on mine BTW.

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 Post subject: restoration
PostPosted: Tue Jan 06, 2004 22:25 pm 
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Joined: Sun Dec 28, 2003 16:41 pm
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Location: Over the Target
Real Name: LEE BOWDEN
Group: FIRST ALLIED AIRBORNE ASSOCIATION
Great advise from the guys above, but like the Webbing advise, dont go too overboard, remember to look realistic in a display senario would you want all your weapons to look like they have just come from the factory, a few dents and scratches here and there is a realistic looking combat weapon. In my service career, I had personel weapons from the early Wood furniture SLR, through to the M16 and latter the SA80, none looked factory new after what they were put through.

Great tips, but dont get too excited about the wood work, much of which were coated in gun oil as the owners were not too particular about keeping this to the metal.

Regards

Lee


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 Post subject: Cheers Guys
PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2004 15:36 pm 
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Joined: Mon Dec 29, 2003 16:54 pm
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Location: Haversham Milton Keynes
Real Name: Matt Nott
Group: FAAA
Thanks for the info guys.

Spent the weekend dismantling the carbine. Managed to remove the foresight and the rear sight( Thanks to the info received from the other forum)found I have a National Postal Meter receiver and Underwood Barrel. Nothing left of the internals all have been removed in De-activation (This gun was still live up until I ordered it from Steve Vickers).

For the time being I have hacksawed the bayonet lug off the barrel band and smoothed it all off. Looking for a type one flip up rear sight.
(Bryn who did you get yours off? The topic on the other forum has disappeared)

Have cleaned up the stock and removed several of the major dents. I,m really please with my results.

Thanks guys

Matt


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 Post subject: Re: Cheers Guys
PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2004 19:10 pm 
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pickman wrote:
Looking for a type one flip up rear sight.
(Bryn who did you get yours off? The topic on the other forum has disappeared)


Andy Scott at AMS in Belgium Matt. He should be at Stoneleigh, Get him to bring you the right bits over. Website is: http://www.amsmilitaria.com/

You'll need the correct "push" safety as well as the flip-up rear site. Those "switch" type ones are post-war.

Cheers,

Bryn

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 Post subject: Sight removal
PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2004 20:49 pm 
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Location: Great Bradley,Newmarket,Suffolk,England
Real Name: Lloyd Richards
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Matt remember a carbine flip sight will only come out "ONE WAY".The punch mark will show you which way to drive it out.
You can get Repro Type 1 barrel bands and also "push safetys"

Has yours got a round or flat bolt
also 2 hole or 4 hole top hand guard

NO INTERNALS....................BUGGER...............

Bless old spec weapons.....................:-)


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2004 21:25 pm 
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Joined: Mon Dec 29, 2003 16:54 pm
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Location: Haversham Milton Keynes
Real Name: Matt Nott
Group: FAAA
Hi Guys,

I used a fine graded wire wool with some wood cleaner that my wife uses for here furiture restoration projects. That got me down to bare wood most of the muck was gun oil. Then used the hot iron trick to list out the major dents but I have left a few in to give it the worn look. I think I need a few more coats to bring out the right colour of wood I want.

Bryn Thanks for the site had lost it from my favorites will contact Andy about a new barrel band and rear sight. Luckly already have a push safety.

Sarge Got the old rear sight off the correct way just needed persuasion with a tack hammer. :D Not clear if I have a flat or round bolt I think flat probably replaced as it was a used live firer. hand guard has two holes. Just looked at the bolt think its a belgium replacement for safetly reasons.


Cheer Guys

Matt

"only 13 non shopping days till stoneliegh"


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2004 21:49 pm 
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Word of warning Matt. The repro Type I barrel bands are s***e !! Don't do it mate. Use your Type III. grind off the bayonet lug and it's a Type II. Perfectly acceptable and much better than the Type I's. The reason they changed to the Type II's is that the Type I's were complete pants. They won't hold the damned thing together properly :D If you're determined to have a Type I look for an original marked one on eBay. Mucho Dinari though.

PS, Lloyd's correct ( ain't he always ? ) the rear sight has to come out to the left side of the reciever and the new one has to go in from the left.

Hope this helps,

Bryn

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 15, 2004 15:04 pm 
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This being my first post on this forum,and at the risk of coming across as a boring f@@t....
If you are going to use linseed oil to restore the woodwork and use a rag to do it with.When the time comes to put away/dump the old cloth bear in mind that this has the potential to spontaneously combust.
Either lay the cloth out flat if you are going to use it again or rinse it out.Don't screw it up and stick it away as there is a good chance it will start a fire,and if you chuck it in your dustbin rinse it through first.

I have restored a couple of stocks on rifles and I find the tip of the hot iron through brown paper works best for me.
Right I'm of to read the rest of the posts,see you in a couple of days!!.

Fireman Sam!!


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