WWIIReenacting.co.uk Forums

Uniting UK Re-enactors since 2003
 

It is currently Fri Jan 24, 2020 0:19 am

Support the Forum
END OF YEAR OFFER - HALF PRICE SUPPORTER MEMBERSHIPS - CLICK THE BANNER TO READ MORE AND SUPPORT THE FORUM

Username



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 2 posts ] 
Author Message
Offline
PostPosted: Fri Apr 08, 2005 22:26 pm 
 WWW  Profile

Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 20:59 pm
Posts: 22
Location: UK/USA
Introduction to Markings on a World War I Vickers MG

Old guns have many markings on them from their service days and by studying them, it is possible to assess some detail of repairs and other events in their existence.

Example: Vickers .303 MG No.C 7299.

This gun was assembled at Vickers Crayford plant during October 1917. It has lightened side plates to the receiver which is uncommon for a gun during this period of World War I.

Next to the serial number are the initials V.S.M. which stands for Vickers Sons & Maxim: the gun’s manufacturers. Next to this is a ‘G.R.’ proof mark which shows Army acceptance/inspection of the gun.

To the left of this are four separate date stamps denoting repair or inspection and are as follows: '29, '37, '39 and '43. The gun is also marked D.P. for drill purpose but these marks have been lined out, meaning that the gun has been put back into service. The '43 stamp shows when this gun was refurbished and was probably for Home Guard use, as a second line weapon. It has had the mounting pin holes bored out and relined to make an accurate fit when set up.

Near the '43 stamp is an Enfield proof mark and this is repeated on the major components of the gun, so it is possible that the work was done at Enfield. The rear receiver and top covers are painted black over the bluing and this would be from the refurbishment. This gun has no Australian service marks so it probably never left British use during its active life.

From a study of markings and some research, it is possible with deduction to attempt to ascertain some historical background on the past life of a gun. Sometimes weapons will have a unit mark, denoting which regiment or unit had the gun and an even greater sense of history can be obtained from these markings.

For a full explanation of markings there are many good textbooks on the subject.

Why not try researching your guns?

_________________
Image
http://www.machinegunnest.co.uk
http://www.machinegunnest.com


Top
 

Support the Forum
END OF YEAR OFFER - HALF PRICE SUPPORTER MEMBERSHIPS - CLICK THE BANNER TO READ MORE AND SUPPORT THE FORUM

Username
Offline
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Apr 11, 2005 21:01 pm 
 Profile

Joined: Fri Dec 03, 2004 21:39 pm
Posts: 720
Location: LINCOLNSHIRE
I'VE GOT AN AUSSIE VICKERS AND I THINK IT WANTS TO GO HOME, BITS KEEP FALLING OFF AND THE QUICKEST WAY TO AUS IS DOWN!!


Top
 

Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 2 posts ] 


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to: